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August 24, 2011

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Fay Furness

Time to move to Detroit. Any space for a family of five?

Andrew Warsinske

Very true. I lived in Ferndale and Hamtramck (neighborhoods just north of the city itself), and spent most of my life in the Detroit area, and you don't have to be an expert to bear witness to the abandoned buildings. I've never seen another city like it. Detroit and Dearborn almost resemble war zones in the way that some properties are so damaged you really would think a bomb hit them.

Many in Detroit are working to re-build, re-habitat and fix up these places. It's sad to say I'm "from the Detroit area" and hear outsiders talk about how damaged the city is. Even the city council (when not being tried for corruption) keeps a negative attitude, seeing those properties as nothing but crack dens. The attitude of revitalizing the city isn't very civic, mostly just a "how can we get rich businesses to come and save us?" attitude.

Detroit is coming back just the same. Growth in some neighborhoods is happening through commitment of the people, rather than government or corporate interests. A lot of my friends have taken up in Corktown, one of the oldest parts of Detroit. Culturally, Detroit is still thriving as ever.

I think Detroit has historically been a huge epicenter for social movements and social change. While my native home is struggling for jobs, money and decent housing, I swear the world has not seen the last of Detroit. It is a part of the country that I do not think will concede to neo-liberal doctrine anytime soon.

Jodi Dean

great line: "I swear the world has not seen the last of Detroit. It is a part of the country that I do not think will concede to neo-liberal doctrine anytime soon."

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